No Holiday from Good Health

Happy summer! I hope that you enjoyed all that June and early July had to offer…Father’s Day, graduations, Fourth of July celebrations and more! With summer in full swing, you may be thinking about vacation plans and relaxing with friends and family. But please don’t forget to take care of your health this summer.

While there’s never a good time to get sick, it turns out that there are times which are especially bad – namely, any weekend and the entire month of July.

Healthcare veterans all know about the so-called “July Effect.” This phenomenon begins every July 1 in the nation’s teaching hospitals, where men and women who have just graduated from medical school begin their very first weeks of field training. At the same time, more experienced trainees graduate and move on to even more specialized fellowship training programs or private practice.

With their lack of experience, newly minted doctors are more likely to run unnecessary or duplicative tests, may be unfamiliar with hospital pharmacies and prescribing standards, and are more prone to make medical errors. As a result, studies have shown that the death rate in teaching hospitals is significantly higher in July than other months.

A related phenomenon is the so-called “Weekend Effect.” This affects all healthcare settings, including non-teaching hospitals, and is observed all year long. It refers to the fact that many hospitals have fewer expert staff available on weekends and overnight, which coincides with the times when many medical emergencies occur. Numerous studies have shown that patients who visit emergency departments, undergo surgery or experience strokes or other significant episodes on a Saturday are likely to have worse outcomes than patients with similar medical conditions who seek care on other days of the week.

Unfortunately, accidents and illness do not take holidays. While enjoying the summer weather, remember to focus on health and safety to help avoid the need for emergency medical care. Here are a few basic tips to help you stay well:
• Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.
• Use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, especially if you are out during the warmest part of the day, usually between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
• Exercise extra caution around pools and water. Never leave a child unattended around water, even for a few seconds.
• Do not leave children or pets inside parked vehicles, even for a few minutes. The interior of a parked car can become dangerously hot very quickly.

Of course, in a medical emergency, there is not much that you can do to avoid either the July Effect or the Weekend Effect. But there are steps you can take to safeguard your health.
• Avoid scheduling elective surgery or procedures in July. Instead, postpone elective procedures until the fall if it is safe for you to do so.
• Hire a health care advocate. If you must undergo medical treatment over the summer, having an advocate by your side may help ensure that you receive safe, appropriate care.
• If you are unable to hire an advocate, ask a trusted friend or family member to stay with you if you are hospitalized over the summer. Make sure this person writes down the names of all of your medications, tests and procedures and keeps track of the staff who are providing your care.

If you have any questions, give me a call! I’d be happy to talk to you about your healthcare needs or upcoming medical encounters. I can be reached at (516) 584-2007.

What Medical Tests Do I Need?

Your doctor may have suggested you take a medical test, while your friend suggested you take another test that helped save her life, and your brother stated that you shouldn’t take any medical tests because they’re all a scam to get your money. Who is right?

I don’t have the answer to that question. But you do!

Here are some questions to ask your clinician so you can make an informed decision:

-What will the results of the test you are suggesting tell us?

-Are you suggesting these tests based on my family history, symptoms I’m showing, or for another reason?

-I have a friend who had very similar symptoms as I have. Could “x” test be appropriate for me to rule out “y” condition?

-Would you please list for me the pros and cons of having this test (i.e. does it generally have a number of false positives. If so, can it lead to unnecessary procedures that can cause more harm than good?)

-When can I call back for those test results?

Remember no news is not good news. If you decide to have a screening or test done, ask when the results should be expected and who will provide you with the results. If you don’t hear from them, it could mean that they forgot or your file got lost. This lack of knowledge is putting your health in jeopardy. Make sure you contact them and get the results.

Information is power so I want to share with you some information from leading healthcare professionals. Consumer Reports published an article assessing the benefits and risks of medical screenings. They did all the work combing through research, speaking with healthcare experts and coming up with the findings. Below are a few of the key take-aways from their report.*

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Screening AAAs can cause life-threatening bleeding. This screening is an ultrasound recommended for men 65-75 who were or are current smokers, as well as men and women in that same age group who have a family history of AAA. If an AAA is found the doctor may suggest monitoring or surgical repair.

Bone Density Screening This is a screening test to detect low bone density (osteopenia) and weak, brittle bones (osteoporosis). Generally recommended for women aged 65 but also for women around the age of menopause if they are at risk (i.e. history of smoking or family history of osteoporosis). Men can consider screening at around age 80. If osteopenia is detected, a diet rich in vitamin D, exercise and calcium are often advised. If osteoporosis is detected the clinician may suggest medication to prevent fractures.

Electrocardiogram (EKG) and exercise stress tests These are done to check for signs of heart disease or arrhythmias. They are recommended for those at high risk for heart disease or those with suspected heart disease or symptoms (i.e. shortness of breath or chest pain) as a diagnostic tool. But for other low-risk people with no symptoms, these tests may lead to inaccurate results and unnecessary procedures.

Lung Cancer Scan This low-dose CT scan images the lungs. It is recommended for adults 55-80 with a “30 pack-year history” (smoking a pack a day for 30 years or two packs a day for 15 years) who currently smoke or quit within the last 15 years. It has been found to detect lung cancer early and prevent death for those at highest risk.

Remember, it is always advised that you speak with your doctor for specific recommendations on the screenings and medical tests that are indicated for your unique situation. If you need help selecting a healthcare provider or need an advocate to ask these questions and coordinate care, we can assist you. Give us a call at (516) 584-2007.

*For information and more in-depth information on these screening see Consumer Reports’ January 2019 article “Too Many Tests?”